A/C And Heat Systems Overview free review A/C And Heat Systems Overview blower relay blower relay horn circuit heater defroster heating system turn freon dashboard warning lights remove heater motor motor refrigerant charging depend cars cutout freon capacity high pressure line ac fan problem relays cooling system capacity ac Below is an overview of this system's operation           The Air Conditioning and Heating System    Not only do we depend on our cars to get us where we want   to go, we also depend on them to get us there without discomfort. We   expect the heater to keep us warm when it's cold outside, and the air   conditioning system to keep us cool when it's hot.   We get heat from the heater core, sort of a secondary   radiator, which is part of the car's cooling system. We get air   conditioning from the car's elaborate air conditioning system.   Despite its relatively small size, the cooling system has   to deal with an enormous amount of heat to protect the engine from   free review   
  • Automotive forum
• Top 1000
• Lifestyle forum
• Sport forum
   
Поиск:   

Home > Auto-reviews > A/C And Heat Systems Overview

  Popular:
Manufacturer Brochure - 1998 BMW Z3 Roadster
1998 BMW Z3 ROADSTER SERIES: 4- AND 6-CYLINDER MODELS WITH…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Lexus LX 470
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Component: ENGINE
ID: SB603908 (1997 MAZDA PROTEGE)
2003 Auto Shows
Automakers raise the curtain on the next big thing to hit…
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM: WIRING: HARNESS: FRONT: UNDERHOOD
ID: SB037219 (1993 FORD PROBE)
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Kia Sportage
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Nissan Frontier
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
New Car Test Drive - 1999 GMC Sonoma SLS 4WD
This truck works hard and plays hard. Base Price $12,672…
Consumer Test Drive - 1999 Ford Windstar
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Nissan King Cab
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Buick Regal
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1999 Mercury Cougar
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Jeep Wrangler
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Mazda Millenia
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1995 Toyota MR2
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1999 Honda Odyssey
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1996 Chrysler Cirrus
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Component: STRUCTURE: BODY
ID: SB602983 (1999 OLDSMOBILE TRUCK SILHOUETTE)
Component: ENGINE
ID: SB602898 (1999 PLYMOUTH BREEZE)
Component: HEATER: WATER: DEFROSTER: DEFOGGER
ID: SB602754 (1999 PONTIAC GRAND AM)

Statistics…
  Sponsored links 
  New:
Pontiac Aztek: It's A Little...Different?
Is the 2001 Pontiac Aztek the world's most versatile…
The Aztek: Behind The Scenes with Brand Manager Don Butler
The Aztek: Behind The Scenes with Brand Manager Don Butler
Mid-Size Sedans: Your Favorites for 2001
The Family Sedan is Growing Up
2001 Suvs: Kings of the Road
Compare six of the best-selling mid--sized SUVs
New Vehicle Safety Guide: Car Talkers just can't Hang it Up
Survey finds drivers know all about cell phone…
Preview: 2002 Corvette Z06
Joining the tightly knit 400-hp club, with five to spare.
Preview: 2002 Freelander
Land Rover's baby ute finally gets its U.S. papers.
Preview: Aston Martin V12 Vanquish
Will Aston?s new technology flagship live up to its…
2001 Convertibles: Drop-Top Fun
A Convertible for Every Budget
Fuel Economy: the Worst Small Cars
Small vehicles with a big appetite for fuel
  TOP-10:
Component: FUEL: FUEL INJECTION: IDLE SPEED CONTROL VALVE
ID: SB037212 (1993 FORD THUNDERBIRD)
Consumer Test Drive - 1999 Honda Odyssey
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1999 Honda Odyssey
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Consumer Test Drive - 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee
Overall Rating: Comfort Rating: Performance Rating: Quality…
Component: FUEL: FUEL INJECTION: IDLE SPEED CONTROL VALVE
ID: SB037212 (1993 MERCURY COUGAR)
'1998 Nissan Sentra SE: Subcompact Super Sedan
Nissan's slogan, "Enjoy The Ride,' is perfect for the '98…
'1998 Audi A4 Sedan: Smooth Performance
If we had to use one word to describe the 1998 Audi A4 2.8…
Component: FUEL: FUEL INJECTION: IDLE SPEED CONTROL VALVE
ID: SB037208 (1993 FORD TRUCK ECONOLINE)
Component: BRAKES: HYDRAULIC: DISC: CALIPER
ID: SB037205 (1993 FORD THUNDERBIRD)

A/C And Heat Systems Overview

A/C And Heat Systems Overview

Updated Jul 7, 2004 20:29:18
Rating  reduce  16 ( -2 -12.5% )
Description:
Below is an overview of this system's operation




The Air Conditioning and Heating System

Not only do we depend on our cars to get us where we want
to go, we also depend on them to get us there without discomfort. We
expect the heater to keep us warm when it's cold outside, and the air
conditioning system to keep us cool when it's hot.
We get heat from the heater core, sort of a secondary
radiator, which is part of the car's cooling system. We get air
conditioning from the car's elaborate air conditioning system.
Despite its relatively small size, the cooling system has
to deal with an enormous amount of heat to protect the engine from
friction and the heat of combustion. The cooling system has to remove
about 6,000 BTU of heat per minute. This is a lot more heat than we need
to heat a large home in cold weather. It's good to know that some of this
heat can be put to the useful purpose of keeping us warm.
Air conditioning makes driving much more comfortable in
hot weather. Your car's air conditioner cleans and dehumidifies (removes
excess moisture), the outside air entering your car. It also has the task
of keeping the air at the temperature you select. These are all big jobs.
How do our cars keep our "riding environment" the way we like it?
Most people think the air conditioning system's job is to
add "cold" air to the interior of the car. Actually, there is no such
thing as "cold," just an absence of heat, or less heat than our bodies are
comfortable with. The job of the air conditioning system is really to
"remove" the heat that makes us uncomfortable, and return the air to the
car's interior in a "un-heated" condition. Air conditioning, or cooling,
is really a process of removing heat from an object (like air).
A compressor circulates a liquid refrigerant called
Refrigerant-12 (we tend to call it "Freon," a trade name, the way we call
copy machines "Xerox" machines). The compressor moves the Refrigerant-12
from an evaporator, through a condenser and expansion valve, right back to
the evaporator. The evaporator is right in front of a fan that pulls the
hot, humid air out of the car's interior. The refrigerant makes the hot
air's moisture condense into drops of water, removing the heat from the
air. Once the water is removed, the "cool" air is sent back into the car's
interior. Aaaaaah! Much better.
Sometimes we worry when we catch our car making a water
puddle on the ground, but are relieved to discover that it's only water
dripping from the air conditioning system's condenser (no color, no smell,
and it dries!).
Note: Refrigerant-12 is extremely dangerous. Many special
precautions must be taken when it is present. It can freeze whatever it
contacts (including your eyes), it is heavier than air and can suffocate
you, and it produces a poisonous gas when it comes in contact with an open
flame.

Dash Controls
Most or all of the control panel of your car is located
on the dashboard behind the steering wheel. Sometimes it extends onto the
car's console, between the two front seats, and onto your steering column.
Little duplicate fragments of the control panel are scattered around the
interior of your vehicle, such as automatic door locks, extra light
switches, etc.
The dash controls enable you to operate your headlights,
turn signals, horn, windshield wipers, heater, defroster, air
conditioning, radio, etc. All of the vehicle's controls should be within
the reach of the driver.
The control panel also contains all of your gauges; gas,
temperature, tachometer, etc. These enable you to monitor the operating
conditions of your engine and charging system, fuel level, oil pressure
and coolant temperature. Warning lights come on to alert you to dangerous
coolant temperatures, or loss of oil pressure.
In 1924 the Nash Co. introduced the electric clock as an
accessory.

Relays
A relay is an electromagnetic device in which contacts
are made and subsequently broken. An example of this would be your car's
horn.
By natural law, the farther electrical current travels,
the lower its voltage becomes. Your car horn has to be connected to the
car battery in order to sound. The shortest distance between two points is
a wire connecting your horn to your battery. The only problem with this
arrangement is that connecting the two would give you a permanent horn
blast when you turned the key in your ignition.
This is an unacceptable arrangement, so a relay is
included in the connection. The relay stops the horn from sounding until
you activate the relay by pressing the horn. The relay then allows the
horn to connect to the battery, or complete the circuit, and it sounds. As
soon as you stop pressing the horn, the relay breaks the connection, or
circuit, and presto-- no more horn!
Relays, with switches, are used for most of the equipment
that depends on the battery for an energy source. This includes
headlights, taillights, radio, etc.
In 1922, a Model T was the first car equipped with a
radio. In 1927, the first commercially produced car radio came on the
scene.
A "relay" is any switching device operated by a low
current circuit that controls opening and closing of another circuit of
high current capacity. The purpose of the "cutout relay" is to prevent the
battery from discharging through the generator when the engine is stopped
or turning over slowly. A "field relay" connects the alternator field
windings and voltage regulator windings directly to the battery.

Heater/AC Blower Motor
The blower motor is the motor that turns the electric fan
in an air conditioning or heating system.

Air Ducts
The air ducts control the passage of hot or cold air into
the interior of the car. They are operated by a control on the dash,
either manually or automatically.

Controls
Most air conditioning/heating systems have three possible
air settings. One is to recirculate the air that is in the car, a second
is to use only air from the outside of the car, and a third is to mix some
of the outside air with the air recirculating inside the car.

Low Pressure Line
The low pressure line is a hose, or tube containing
refrigerant that connects the evaporator to the air conditioning system's
compressor. The compressor draws the low pressure refrigerant from the
evaporator in through the low pressure line in order to compress
it.

High Pressure Line
The high pressure line is a hose, or tube containing
refrigerant that connects the air conditioning system's compressor to the
condenser. The compressor forces the compressed refrigerant into the
condenser through the high pressure
line.

Similar news:
Find all news similar on A/C And Heat Systems Overview

Similar articles:
Find all articles similar on A/C And Heat Systems Overview


Home > Auto-reviews > A/C And Heat Systems Overview

Now discuss on our sport forum:
World Championship - day 7
Close...Again...(sigh!)
Is it Gay-$
Now discuss on our automotive conference:
Audi 100
ST185
legal advice
see also:
Component: ELECTRICAL SYSTEM…
Component: ENGINE: PULLEY: CRANKSHAFT
Component: BRAKES: SERVICE BRAKES

Copyright © 2001—2018 XOIB
Идея:
Advertisement